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Strategic Management and Organizational Dynamics

Introduction

Change is a widespread feature in the life of organizations and the capability to handle such changes is the core competence of success in an organization (Senge et al., 2004, p. 4). The main drivers of organizational changes over the last two decades have been globalization, advancement in technology, and fluctuation in the global economy. This has led to a distressing exploration of mechanisms for achieving competitive advantage through increased radical forms of change (Stacey, 2003, p. 8; Burnes, 2004, p.4).

Main Body

Cortese (2003) recommended that organizational strategies must take the form of s process of continuous learning, in which at the limit, preparation and execution becomes impossible to tell apart. He proposes that organizations should generate, develop, and maintain excellent business designs capable of taking advantage of its strategic landscape and business environment beyond the lifetime series of changes in an organization. This can only be achieved through the self-organizing process of individual employees. He acknowledges the role of strategic planning and the formation of networks since individual errors may have a severe impact on the organization as a whole (Cortese, 2003, p. 16-17).

Senge et al (2008) explain how individuals and organizations work jointly to create a sustainable planet. He developed new ideologies related to leadership using an organized approach. The systematic approach views the entire organization as a complex system with interconnected parts. The constituents of an organization include the management, general employees, and stakeholders.

He describes sustainable thinkers as innovators who work relentlessly to create a regenerative economy in the future and are capable of viewing and understanding the system in which they live and work. Their vision is beyond the events and organizational boundaries thus make critical choices that take into consideration the natural and societal edge so as to create sustainable cycles of innovation (Senge et al., 2008, p.4).

Semiconductor companies usually partake in either the design or the manufacture of the various units needed in the market. Due to the high cost of acquiring and maintaining facilities, many companies have adopted this technique of either designing or building products to reduce the cost that would pile up if a company was to undertake both of these processes. Semi-conductor type industries can benefit a lot from the value chain and competitive analysis in their decision making. The main reason why the two processes of design and manufacture are separated is so that a company can ensure that its facilities are fully operational and that they do not drain the finances of the company that owns them (Stacey, 2003, p. 9).

Using value chain analysis, a company can understand how its business processes compare with other companies and thus decide whether it can risk production or partake in designing only. The value chain can also help the company in deciding whether it should outsource some of its business activities to minimize costs and to avoid purchasing expensive facilities that may not be fully operational and thus drain the company resources. The competitive advantage analysis on the other hand is very important as the company can have a good understanding of its working environment. This will in turn help in pricing, scheduling of activities, and sub-contracting in order to ensure that the company’s facilities work at optimum capacity (DiMaggio, 2001, p. 5).

Over the years, Vanderbilt University Medical Center has steadily improved its services and business activities to become one of the best healthcare centers in the country. The center has a medical school that provides countless medical interns and professionals whose values are aligned with the company. The center’s research center is one of the best and is the home of two of the country’s Nobel Laureates.

The company has also undertaken market research and has invested in medical services that people really need. As proof of strategic thinking, the company is also very active in humanitarian and charity care activities around its neighborhood and in other parts of the country. This ensures that the company keeps its consumer perception high securing its reputation among its stakeholders (Johnson & Scholes, 2001; Anderson, 2006, p. 3).

Conclusion

Organizational strategies must take the form of continuous learning, in which at the limit, preparation and execution become impossible to tell apart. They should generate, develop, and maintain excellent business designs capable of taking advantage of its strategic landscape and business environment beyond the lifetime series of changes in an organization. Strategic planning and the formation of networks are very significant since individual errors may have a severe impact on the organization.

Strategic planning of the SSP organization should take the form of value-chain and competitive advantage analysis. Value chain analysis ensures exceptional business processes and enables an organization to compete and improve its portfolio. Competitive advantage analysis highlights various opportunities that an organization can take advantage of within its region. It also provides various strengths that the organization has in order to compete in the industry.

References

Anderson, T.L. (2006). Vanderbilt University Medical Center. Web.

Burnes, B. (2004). Kurt Lewin and Complexity Theories: back to the future? Journal of Change Management 4(4), 309-325.

Cortese, A. D. (2003). The critical role of higher education in creating a sustainable future. Planning for Higher Education 31(3), 15-22.

DiMaggio, P. (2001).The Twenty-First-Century Firm: Changing Economic Organization in International Perspective. Princeton and Oxford: Princeton University Press.

Johnson, G., & Scholes, K. (2001). Exploring Corporate Strategy Text and Cases, 6th ed. London: Prentice-Hall.

Senge, P., Smith, B., Kruschwitz, N., Laur, J., & Schley, L. (2008). The necessary revolution: How individ­uals and organizations are working together to create a sustainable world. New York: Doubleday.

Senge, P. Scharmer, C. O., Jaworski, J. & Flowers, B. S. (2004). Presence: An Exploration of Profound Change in People, Organizations, and Society. New York: Doubleday.

Stacey, R.D. (2003) Strategic Management and Organizational Dynamics: The Challenge of Complexity. Harlow: Prentice-Hall.

Annotated Bibliography

Burnes, B. (2004). Kurt Lewin and Complexity Theories: back to the future? Journal of Change Management 4(4), 309-325.

This article explores the change in an organization from the viewpoint of Lewin’s planned approach and complexity theories. Lewin’s approach has been criticized over the past two decades for being too excessively mechanistic and view organizational change in a simplistic way. Therefore, people may assume that there is no general ground between the approach, organizational change, and complexity theories. From this article, it is clear that this is not the case.

Senge, P., Smith, B., Kruschwitz, N., Laur, J., & Schley, L. (2008). The necessary revolution: How individ­uals and organizations are working together to create a sustainable world. New York: Doubleday.

This book explains how individuals and organizations work jointly to create a sustainable planet. The author bases his ideology on the premise that organizations have now realized the significance of sustainability. It explains that people are increasingly starting to be aware of the fact that the sustainability crisis is interrelated and is a sign of the larger universal system that has fallen off the edge. As a result of this understanding, people’s view of the sustainability problem has changed.

They have begun to embrace astonishing opportunities for innovation that can take place when fearful and reactive mentalities are abandoned. Their vision is beyond the events and organizational boundaries thus make critical choices which take into consideration the natural and societal edge so as to create sustainable cycles of innovation.